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Marine Propulsion & Auxiliary Machinery

Marine Propulsion & Auxiliary Machinery

Three routes to detainment on PSC emissions inspection questionnaire

Fri 03 Aug 2018 by Jamey Bergman

Three routes to detainment on PSC emissions inspection questionnaire
Three of the questions on the questionnaire could result in a vessel being detained

Paris and Tokyo MOUs on Port State Control (PSC) have agreed a questionnaire for use by inspectors during an intensive campaign that will focus on MARPOL Annex VI compliance.

Three of the questions on the questionnaire could result in a vessel being detained.

If vessels are unable to provide bunker delivery notes that show delivery and use of fuels compliant with mandated sulphur levels and if ships do not have approved fuel cleaning equipment such as scrubbers installed, they could be detained, according to a joint statement from the Paris and Tokyo PSC authorities.

Additionally, if a vessel’s master and crew cannot show familiarity with essential shipboard procedures in the approved volatile organic compound (VOC) management plan, the vessel could be detained.

The two PSC regimes along with the Indian Ocean MOU and Black Sea MOU announced their concentrated inspection campaigns (CICs) around shipping emissions are set to begin 1 September 2018 and run through 30 November 2018.   

The Tokyo and Paris MOUs alone intend to carry out 10,000 inspections during the timeframe. Ships will be subject to one inspection during the inspection period, according to a joint statement from the Paris and Tokyo PSC authorities, after which campaign results will be analysed and presented for submission to IMO.

The CICs have four objectives, and all objectives are intended to send a clear message to the shipping industry that IMO regulations will be enforced and enforced consistently across many of the regional PSC authorities around the globe.

According to Tokyo and Paris MOUs’ statement, the inspection campaign’s first goal is to establish a baseline of current MARPOL Annex VI compliance within the shipping industry.

Secondly, the two groups say they intend to emphasize the importance of MARPOL Annex VI compliance and the prevention of air pollution to crew and shipowners.  

The campaigns are also intended to “send a signal to the industry that prevention of air pollution and enforcement of compliance … is high on the agenda of both MoU member States” and to underline the Port State Control regimes’ collective responsibility for “harmonised enforcement of compliance … thus improving the level of compliance and ensuring a level playing field”.

With IMO’s global cap on sulphur levels in fuel coming into effect on 1 January 2020, the CIC could, in addition to building awareness around compliance, offer a glimpse into the volume of inspections that may be carried out by port states intent on heavily enforcing IMO regulations.

MARPOL Annex VI sets limits on sulphur- and nitrogen oxide emissions from ship exhausts and prohibits deliberate emissions of ozone-depleting substances and volatile organic compounds.


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